Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

A Comic Cover A Day (is awesome)

1218219221223224234

Comments

  • OriusOrius Posts: 188
    edited July 2018
    image
    Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 #82
    Release Date: September, 1983
    Pencils and Inks: Al Milgrom
    Colors: Bob Sharen
    Writer: Bill Mantlo

    Another nice cover with a few things to like: 1) the effect of Spidey hanging from the top of the cover, and 2) Cloak and Dagger facing each other as the Kingpin and the Punisher stand in the way.
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,305
    Orius said:

    image
    Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 #82
    Release Date: September, 1983
    Pencils: Al Milgrom
    Inks: Jim Mooney
    Colors: Bob Sharen
    Writer: Bill Mantlo

    Another nice cover with a few things to like: 1) the effect of Spidey hanging from the top of the cover, and 2) Cloak and Dagger facing each other as the Kingpin and the Punisher stand in the way.

    Mooney inked the interior of the book, but going by the signature on the cover, Milgrom inked himself on the cover.
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,305
    edited July 2018
    Last day at the beach. Here’s Leave it to Binky #61 (Jun.-Jul. 1968) by Bob Oksner—released nearly ten years after issue #60 (posted yesterday), in case you couldn’t tell by Binky and Peggy’s updated designs. I love how the wave has “fingers” and is reaching out to grab Binky.

    image
  • OriusOrius Posts: 188
    image
    Web of Spider-Man Vol. 1 #52
    Release Date: July, 1989
    Pencils: Alex Saviuk
    Inks: Frank Giacoia
    Colors: Bob Sharen
  • OriusOrius Posts: 188
    image
    The Superior Spider-Man #31 (Campbell Variant)
    Publish Date: June 2014
    Pencils and Inks: Jeff Scott Campbell
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,305

    image

    Pencils by Gene Colan, inks by Tom Palmer (explosion background inked by Joe Rubinstein).
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,305
    Today’s entry from the DC cover-a-day calendar: Plastic Man #8 (Sept. 2004), by Kyle Baker (pencils, inks, and color).

    image
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,305
    And one entry from the DC cover-a-day calendar that popped up while I was out of town: Supergirl #7 (Oct. 1973), penciled and inked by Bob Oksner, because of course Bob Oksner came up while I was posting Oksner covers every day.

    image
  • BrackBrack Posts: 799
    Orius said:

    image
    The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 #402
    Release Date: June, 1995
    Pencils: Mark Bagley
    Inks: Larry Mahlstedt
    Colors: Bob Sharen

    Aunt May's soul. Ah boy, the '90s. Never gets old.

    I'm looking up this dude (Judas Traveller) on the cover, he seems to have gone from a genuine mystical character (under DeMatteis) to a fraud (under Defalco) to never seen again. Which wouldn't be the first time Defalco crushed a character under foot...

    Was he always hinted at being a fake, or did that come later?

    Anyway, as this is the cover thread, here's a cover from the Lee/Romita arc that excuses all sorts of mystical nonsense being tied to Spider-Man. Though gangsters trying to get their hands of magic items is more fun that actual wizards showing up.

    image
  • OriusOrius Posts: 188
    edited July 2018
    Brack said:

    Which wouldn't be the first time Defalco crushed a character under foot...

    That's a little unfair, but whatever.
  • BrackBrack Posts: 799
    edited July 2018
    Orius said:

    Brack said:

    Which wouldn't be the first time Defalco crushed a character under foot...

    That's a little unfair, but whatever.
    What else do you call what he had done to Captain Marvel/Monica Rambeau? I won't blame him for the Hobgoblin mess, as that seems to be due to miscommunication, but that hit job on Stern's Avengers run turned me off Defalco's decision making for life.

    And to keep it cover related, all so he could deliver this classic Avengers line-up for the big 300th issue...

    image
  • OriusOrius Posts: 188
    Brack said:

    Orius said:

    Brack said:

    Which wouldn't be the first time Defalco crushed a character under foot...

    That's a little unfair, but whatever.
    What else do you call what he had done to Captain Marvel/Monica Rambeau? I won't blame him for the Hobgoblin mess, as that seems to be due to miscommunication, but that hit job on Stern's Avengers run turned me off Defalco's decision making for life.
    As always, let's agree to disagree.

    Also, you don't have to keep it cover-related. It's called "Comic Cover A DAY".
  • OriusOrius Posts: 188
    image
    Spider-Man Unlimited Vol. 3 #3
    Release Date: July 2004
    Pencils: Steve McNiven
    Inks: Mark Morales
    Colors: Morry Hollowell
  • OriusOrius Posts: 188
    edited July 2018
    image
    The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 #437
    Release Date: August 1998
    Pencils: Rafael Kayanan
    Inks: Bud LaRosa
    Colors: Bob Sharen

    Man, the look of Spidey's mutated face sucks. Looks all weird and unrealistic. Guess that's just the kind of quality you'd expect from the '90s.
  • RobAndersonRobAnderson Posts: 553
    edited July 2018

    R.I.P. Steve Ditko.



    image

  • OriusOrius Posts: 188
    edited July 2018
    image
    Spider-Man: Breakout #5
    Release Date: October 2005
    Pencils and Inks: Mike Deodato Jr.
    Colors: Chris Sotomayer
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,305
    Today’s entry from the DC cover-a-day calendar: Wonder Woman #6 (Fall 1943), pencilled and inked by H.G. Peter. The issue features the three-part, 44-page story introducing the Cheetah.

    image
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,305

    image

    Two great Ditko co-creations together for the first time!
  • mphilmphil Posts: 431

    Today’s entry from the DC cover-a-day calendar: Wonder Woman #6 (Fall 1943), pencilled and inked by H.G. Peter. The issue features the three-part, 44-page story introducing the Cheetah.

    Wonder Woman consistently had excellent covers in the golden age. Was it rotating cast of cover artists or was there someone who did most of them?
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,305
    mphil said:

    Today’s entry from the DC cover-a-day calendar: Wonder Woman #6 (Fall 1943), pencilled and inked by H.G. Peter. The issue features the three-part, 44-page story introducing the Cheetah.

    Wonder Woman consistently had excellent covers in the golden age. Was it rotating cast of cover artists or was there someone who did most of them?
    H.G. Peter penciled and inked every Wonder Woman cover (including Sensation Comics) from the beginning until 1949. On top of that, he pencilled and inked practically every WW story in Wonder Woman, Sensation, and All Star during that time period as well, and continued drawing Wonder Woman stories until 1957—though he did have a series of background inkers who assisted him. Fittingly enough, all those assistants were women artists. He was married to a woman cartoonist (they wed in 1912—he was born in 1880), and was an early supporter of women’s rights. In fact he was an illustrator for The Modern Woman magazine from 1912 to 1917.
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 3,857

    mphil said:

    Today’s entry from the DC cover-a-day calendar: Wonder Woman #6 (Fall 1943), pencilled and inked by H.G. Peter. The issue features the three-part, 44-page story introducing the Cheetah.

    Wonder Woman consistently had excellent covers in the golden age. Was it rotating cast of cover artists or was there someone who did most of them?
    H.G. Peter penciled and inked every Wonder Woman cover (including Sensation Comics) from the beginning until 1949. On top of that, he pencilled and inked practically every WW story in Wonder Woman, Sensation, and All Star during that time period as well, and continued drawing Wonder Woman stories until 1957—though he did have a series of background inkers who assisted him. Fittingly enough, all those assistants were women artists. He was married to a woman cartoonist (they wed in 1912—he was born in 1880), and was an early supporter of women’s rights. In fact he was an illustrator for The Modern Woman magazine from 1912 to 1917.
    Left or right-handed?

    DON'T LOOK IT UP-- I want it from memory.
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,305
    David_D said:

    mphil said:

    Today’s entry from the DC cover-a-day calendar: Wonder Woman #6 (Fall 1943), pencilled and inked by H.G. Peter. The issue features the three-part, 44-page story introducing the Cheetah.

    Wonder Woman consistently had excellent covers in the golden age. Was it rotating cast of cover artists or was there someone who did most of them?
    H.G. Peter penciled and inked every Wonder Woman cover (including Sensation Comics) from the beginning until 1949. On top of that, he pencilled and inked practically every WW story in Wonder Woman, Sensation, and All Star during that time period as well, and continued drawing Wonder Woman stories until 1957—though he did have a series of background inkers who assisted him. Fittingly enough, all those assistants were women artists. He was married to a woman cartoonist (they wed in 1912—he was born in 1880), and was an early supporter of women’s rights. In fact he was an illustrator for The Modern Woman magazine from 1912 to 1917.
    Left or right-handed?

    DON'T LOOK IT UP-- I want it from memory.
    Very funny. Seriously, though, I only recall seeing one photo of him. He was standing with a pipe in his left hand, and what might have been a pencil in his right hand. So I'm guessing right-handed.
  • mphilmphil Posts: 431

    mphil said:

    Today’s entry from the DC cover-a-day calendar: Wonder Woman #6 (Fall 1943), pencilled and inked by H.G. Peter. The issue features the three-part, 44-page story introducing the Cheetah.

    Wonder Woman consistently had excellent covers in the golden age. Was it rotating cast of cover artists or was there someone who did most of them?
    H.G. Peter penciled and inked every Wonder Woman cover (including Sensation Comics) from the beginning until 1949. On top of that, he pencilled and inked practically every WW story in Wonder Woman, Sensation, and All Star during that time period as well, and continued drawing Wonder Woman stories until 1957—though he did have a series of background inkers who assisted him. Fittingly enough, all those assistants were women artists. He was married to a woman cartoonist (they wed in 1912—he was born in 1880), and was an early supporter of women’s rights. In fact he was an illustrator for The Modern Woman magazine from 1912 to 1917.

    Brilliant. One of the oldest comics I own is Wonder Woman #25. So I had to look it up and sure enough, there's H.G. Peter's signature right there on the cover.

    image
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 3,857

    David_D said:

    mphil said:

    Today’s entry from the DC cover-a-day calendar: Wonder Woman #6 (Fall 1943), pencilled and inked by H.G. Peter. The issue features the three-part, 44-page story introducing the Cheetah.

    Wonder Woman consistently had excellent covers in the golden age. Was it rotating cast of cover artists or was there someone who did most of them?
    H.G. Peter penciled and inked every Wonder Woman cover (including Sensation Comics) from the beginning until 1949. On top of that, he pencilled and inked practically every WW story in Wonder Woman, Sensation, and All Star during that time period as well, and continued drawing Wonder Woman stories until 1957—though he did have a series of background inkers who assisted him. Fittingly enough, all those assistants were women artists. He was married to a woman cartoonist (they wed in 1912—he was born in 1880), and was an early supporter of women’s rights. In fact he was an illustrator for The Modern Woman magazine from 1912 to 1917.
    Left or right-handed?

    DON'T LOOK IT UP-- I want it from memory.
    Very funny. Seriously, though, I only recall seeing one photo of him. He was standing with a pipe in his left hand, and what might have been a pencil in his right hand. So I'm guessing right-handed.
    That... or he was trying very hard to make us all think so.
  • OriusOrius Posts: 188
    edited July 2018
    image
    Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 #9
    Release Date: August 1977
    Pencils: George Perez
    Inks: Frank Giacoia
    Colors: Phil Rachelson
    Writer: Bill Mantlo

    Another great example of the "Spectacular" title differentiating itself from "Amazing" with its bigger focus on gritty social issues.
Sign In or Register to comment.