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A Comic Cover A Day (is awesome)

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  • ToneboneTonebone Posts: 844
    Orius said:

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    Web of Spider-Man Vol. 1 #89
    Release Date: June, 1992
    Pencils: Alex Saviuk
    Inks: Bob McLeod

    I see someone named "McLeck" under Saviuk's name. I'm guessing that's the inker?

    I am always saddened when I see two seasoned artists being forced to ape that crappy 90's Lee/Leifield style.
  • ToneboneTonebone Posts: 844

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    This book was the bomb. Some FANTASTIC Trevor Von Eeden artwork.
  • ToneboneTonebone Posts: 844

    Bob Oksner being a bit naughty: Superman’s Girlfriend Lois Lane #27.
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    He has XRay vision, but can't see through water.
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,190
    The first George Pérez comic I owned as a kid (I still have it). Ironically the cover came off of it pretty early on, so I don't know if I had the 25¢ version or the 30¢ version (it was probably the 25¢ version). The cover was penciled by George, but the inker is unknown. John Romita almost certainly made alterations to some of the figures, and may have inked the whole thing. Then again, maybe Dan Adkins inked it. Either way, here’s the cover to Avengers #150 (Aug. 1976).

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  • mwhitt80mwhitt80 Posts: 3,943
    edited January 22
    In honor of everyone getting Liefeld names and stories I present a series of Liefeld covers.
    There are lots of places to start, but I will go to the first place I remember seeing Rob.
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  • mwhitt80mwhitt80 Posts: 3,943
    Next up is the last of Rob's marvel work for a while.
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    Tomorrow we get extreme
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    I still love this series. Karl Kesel manages to soften Liefeld's linework, in a way that is terribly appealing to me.
  • mwhitt80mwhitt80 Posts: 3,943
    edited January 25
    It's Time to get extremely awesome. In 1992 the hottest creators left marvel. You probably know I have gotten a lot of enjoyment from objectively bad image comics of this era. But I will always point out we would not have an image comics without Todd and Rob really pushing for the other founders to leave marvel.
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    I recommend twomorrows Image Comics: Road to Independence for a good oral history of image comics.
    edit: people always bag Rob for not drawing feet (BTW no one in comics draws feet). The thing that always drove me nuts he forgot to draw a freaking string on a bow then it became thing. It still to this day drives me nuts
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,190
    The first comic to feature a Wonder Woman story written by a woman: Wonder Woman #12 (Spring 1945), cover art by H.G. Peter. Joye Hummell (her maiden name—she married in 1947) wrote approximately 75 Wonder Woman stories over the course of her brief career (1944–47). When William Moulton Marston died in 1947, she took over as head writer, but very soon after left comics to care for her newly acquired step-daughter.

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  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,190
    I've been reading The Collected Toppi vol. 1: The Enchanted World the past week. It's a collection of his short stories done for various magazines, but rather than present his work in order by publication date, Lion Forge has chosen to group stories by genre/theme, with this first volume focusing on fantasy, fairy tales, and ghost stories. Toppi almost exclusively in the European market, but he did do covers for Marvel’s 1602: New World miniseries. Here’s his cover for the final issue of the series (Jan. 2006).

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  • mwhitt80mwhitt80 Posts: 3,943
    edited February 7


    Nevermind

  • mwhitt80mwhitt80 Posts: 3,943

    Is anyone else having problems posting covers ?

  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,190
    Nope.

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  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,190
    Happy Valentine’s Day, courtesy of Nick Cardy!

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  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,190
    edited March 19
    Dec. 1956: During this time period, Jerry Grandenetti was the cover artist for all of DC’s war books. Sort of the pre-Joe Kubert, if you will. He had four covers this month, and they're all interesting, dynamic images. It’s no wonder Roy Lichtenstein ripped off his work just a few years later. But then, Grandenetti had great training. He was originally studying to be an architect before the war. But after serving a stint in the navy in the early years of WWII, he went to the Pratt Institute, and his first professional job was working as an assistant under Will Eisner on The Spirit. By the end of the decade he was doing much of the penciling for the strip, as well as penciling and inking comic book stories Eisner packaged for Fiction House and others.

    In 1951 Grandenetti began freelancing for DC in 1951, and continued working for them for the rest of his career in comics. He never drew superheroes—he came close with characters like the Phantom Stranger and Nightmaster (which he co-created)—but he drew pretty much every other genre. He particularly excelled at war and horror stories though, and he drew a ton of them over the years. He was also the first DC artist to use half-tones in their cover art.

    In the ’60s Grandenetti began doing jobs for other publishers as well, most notably his outstanding work for Warren’s magazines. He also began getting work in illustration (the field he really wanted to be in) and advertising, but continued working in comics until 1984, co-creating Prez and the Green Team with Joe Simon along the way.

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  • VertighostVertighost Posts: 237
    edited March 29
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,190
    It's that time of year again. Play ball! Superman #66 (Sept.-Oct. 1950) penciled and inked by Al Plastino.

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  • ToneboneTonebone Posts: 844
    Superboy and the Legion of Super-Heroes #259 - by Dick Giordano

    This was the first Legion book I bought as a teen, having been attracted by the colorful cover and awesome logo design. I was hooked and read the Legion off and on for the next decade.

    I was, however, never a big fan of Cosmic Boy's bustier costume.

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  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 6,190
    One of my purchases at Heroes Con this weekend: Hot Wheels #3 (Jul.-Aug. 1970), cover art by Neal Adams (pencils and inks).

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